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Origen
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Origen

Origen (Greek: Ὠριγένης, c.185 - c.254 C.E.) was one of the most distinguished theologians and scholars of the early Christian Church. He is thought to have been born at Alexandria around 185 C.E., and died at Caesarea around 254 C.E. Known for his brilliant and extensive writings, Origen also became famous for his voluntary castration and championing of the ascetic lifestyle.

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Parmenides

Previous (Parliament Acts) Next (Parochial school) Parmenides of Elea (c. 515 - 450 B.C.E.) was a Greek pre-Socratic philosopher, born in Elea, a Greek city on the southern coast of Italy. He is reported to have been a student of Xenophanes, a teacher of Zeno of Elea, and a major thinker of the Eleatic school.
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Paramita

Colored items are in both lists. The term Pāramitā or Pāramī ( Sanskrit and Pāli respectively) means "Perfect" or "Perfection." In Buddhism, the Paramitas refer to the perfection or culmination of certain virtues, which purify karma and help the aspirant to live an unobstructed life on the path to Enlightenment.
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Parathyroid gland

The parathyroid glands are small endocrine glands found in all tetrapod (four-limbed) vertebrates (that is, except fish) and that produce parathyroid hormone, which regulates calcium and phosphate levels in the extracellular fluids. The parathyroid gland is generally located near the thyroid gland. The vertebrate body is a wonder of intricately coordinated mechanisms which maintain homeostasis (balance) for proper functioning.
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Parliament Acts

Since the 1949 Act became law, doubts were raised by legal academics as to whether the use of the 1911 Act to pass the 1949 Act, which amended the 1911 Act itself, was valid. [1] [2] [3] Three main concerns were raised: The continued ability of the House of Lords to veto a bill to prolong the life of Parliament would not be entrenched if the 1911 Act could be used to amend itself first, removing this The Parliament Acts are two Acts of Parliament of the United Kingdom, passed in 1911 and 1949, that form part of the Constitution of the United Kingdom.
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Robert E. Park

Robert Ezra Park (February 14, 1864 - February 7, 1944) was an American urban sociologist, one of the founders of the Chicago School of sociology, who introduced and developed the field of human ecology. Park began his career as a journalist, having the idea of presenting the news in an accurate and timely fashion, believing that this would best serve the public.
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Parapsychology

The term parapsychology refers to the scientific study of certain paranormal phenomena, referred to as "Psi" phenomena. The scientific reality of parapsychological phenomena and the validity of scientific parapsychological research is a matter of frequent dispute and criticism. The field is regarded by some critics as a pseudoscience.
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Charlie Parker

Charles "Charlie" Parker, Jr. (August 29, 1920 - March 12, 1955) was an American jazz saxophonist and composer and, with Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and Miles Davis, among the most influencial figures in jazz history. Early in his career Parker was dubbed "Yardbird," later shortened to "Bird," which remained his nickname for the rest of his life.
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Parole

Parole is the release of a person from prison prior to the end of his sentence. It involves some restrictions, usually involving a level of supervision and minimum standards of conduct as well as limited freedom of movement. Violation of parole generally constitutes grounds for reincarceration. Parole is granted based on a prisoner's good behavior while incarcerated, plus additional considerations.
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Matthew Parker

Matthew Parker (August 6, 1504 - May 17, 1575) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1559 until his death in 1575 and was the major architect of the Elizabethan religious settlement, in which the Church of England maintained a distinct identity apart from Roman Catholicism and Protestantism. Parker studied at Cambridge, where he was influenced by the writings of Martin Luther and other reformers.
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Pardon

Pardon and related terms differ subtly from country-to-country. Generally, however, the follow definitions hold. [1] [2] Amnesty Amnesty is an act of justice by which the supreme power in a state restores those who may have been guilty of any offense against it to the position of innocent persons. It includes more than a pardon, inasmuch as it obliterates all legal remembrance of the offense.
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Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker (August 22, 1893 - June 7, 1967) was an American writer, poet, critic, and influential feminist. Her reputation is legendary, and she is known today as one of the most brilliant writers in American history. Her thoughts and ideas, presented in her characteristic style of illustrating human nature with caustic wit, revolutionized the way many people thought, especially women.
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Mungo Park

Mungo Park (September 11, 1771 - 1806) was a Scottish physician and explorer of the African continent who explorations in the Niger area on behalf of the British African Association helped to open up vast territories for trade and colonization. His exploits became iconic among explorers of Africa but while few doubt his courage and his determination to tread where no European had trod, his reputation among Africans was as a "ruthless murderer.
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Paris Peace Conference, 1919

Previous (Paris Opera Ballet) Next (Park Chung-hee) The Paris Peace Conference of 1919 was a conference organized by the victors of World War I to negotiate the peace treaties between the Allied and Associated Powers and the defeated Central Powers, that concluded with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles.
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Parasurama

Previous (Parasite) Next (Parasympathetic nervous system) Parasurama , from the Sanskrit parasu ("axe") and rama ("man"), is the sixth avatar of the Hindu god Vishnu. The religion of Hinduism teaches that whenever humanity is threatened by extreme social disorder and wickedness, Vishnu will descend into the world as an avatar to restore righteousness, establish cosmic order, and redeem humanity from danger.
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Paris Opera Ballet

Previous (Paris Commune) Next (Paris Peace Conference, 1919) The Palais Garnier, home of the Paris Opéra Ballet today. The Paris Opéra Ballet is the official ballet company of the Opéra national de Paris , otherwise known as the Palais Garnier , though known more popularly simply as the Paris Opéra .
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Parochial school

Parochial school is a term used (particularly in the United States) to describe a school attached to a church parish. Parochial schools teach the same core curriculum as public and non-sectarian private schools, but also include courses on the doctrines of the church and often offer a faith-based interpretation in other subjects.
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Parenting

Parenting is the process of rearing children by promoting and supporting their physical, emotional, social, intellectual, moral and spiritual development from infancy to adulthood. This is usually done in a child's family by the mother and father (the biological parents). Where parents are unable or unwilling to provide this care, the responsibility may be taken on by close relatives, such as older siblings, aunts and uncles, or grandparents.
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Celestia Susannah Parrish

Celestia (Celeste) Susannah Parrish (September 12, 1853 - September 7, 1918) was an American educator, psychologist, and social advocate. She is famous for her promotion of higher education for women and progressive education for children. She established the first psychology laboratory in "the south," at the Randolph-Macon Women's College in Lynchburg, Virginia.
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Paris Commune

Previous (Paris, France) Next (Paris Opera Ballet) Destruction of the Vendôme Column during the Paris Commune (This and other pictures were later used to identify and execute Communards) This article refers to the government of Paris in 1871, for the one during the French Revolution see Paris Commune (French Revolution).
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Talcott Parsons

Talcott Parsons (December 13, 1902 - May 8, 1979) was an American sociologist who established the sociology department at Harvard University. His work was enormously influential through the 1950s and well into the 1960s, particularly in America, but fell gradually out of favor from that time on. Parsons advocated the "grand theory" approach, encompassing not only sociology but also all the social sciences.
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